College of Arts & Sciences Course Listing

Anthropology

ANT 121 (3) Peoples and Cultures of the World

Instructor: Staff

Course Description: Case studies of global cultural diversity. Exploration of daily life, rites of passage, marriage, family, work, politics, social life, religion, ritual, and art among foraging, agricultural, and industrial societies.

 

ANT 270/470 (1-6) Experience Credit

Instructor: Individual Professor

Course Description:
A variety of internships, laboratory practicals, and directed research can be taken through arrangement with individual professors. Many projects involve participation in research projects. Open to both majors and non-majors.

 

ANT 290/490 (1-6) Independent Study

Instructor: Individual Professors

Course Description:
Students actively participate in well-focused research projects. Projects are developed with individual professors.

 

ANT 442 (4) Method and Theory in Archaeology

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Formulation and conduct of archaeological research. Methods used to obtain and analyze data. Theories and methods of fields fundamental to archaeological interpretation. Laboratory included. Prereq: ANT 141 or permission of instructor.

 

ANT 445/645 (3) Public Policy and Archaeology

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Proactive critique of public policy and implementation efforts to preserve and protect archaeological and historical sites and resources. Active research on legislation impacting local sites and historic structures.

 

ANT 453/653 (3) Poverty, Policy and Human Services

Instructor: Michael Freedman

Course Description:
National programs and local interventions that address poverty related social conditions in Syracuse and Onondaga county. Field study of current policies and practices in government and in health, education, and human service agencies.

 

ANT 484/684 (3) Social Movement Research Methods

Instructor: John Burdick

Course Description:
A range of research methodologies relevant to the study of social movements. Stimulates critical thinking about these metholodigies; ethical implications. Students develop proposals for projects carried out the following semester. Prereq: ANT 483/684. Course is offered every other spring.

* For Graduate level Anthropology courses, see the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs course listing page.

 

 

Linguistics

LIN 471/671 (3) Dimension of Bilingualism and Multiculturalism

Instructor: Professor Tej Bhatia

Course Description:
Foundations, theory, and practice of bilingual/bicultural education. Critical concepts of linguistics, sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic issues and methods as applied to bilingualism/multiculturalism. Additional work required of graduate students.

 

 

Political Science

PSC 121 (3) American National Government and Politics

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
American political institutions. Basic principles embedded in structure and practices of American government. Practical consequences of this political system for the citizen.

 

PSC 317 (3) Local Internship

Instructor: Reeher

Course Description:
Students work in conjunction with members of Congress, state legislature, or in local political campaigns. Representatives of these offices come to seminars for discussions about working in government and politics. Permission of instructor required.

 

 

Public Affairs and Citizenship

PAF 101 (3) An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy

Instructor: William Coplin

Course Description:
Techniques widely used by government, business, and public communications to evaluate public policy; their application to a problem area selected from research activities of Syracuse faculty in social sciences and professional schools.

 

PAF 110 (1) Public Service Practicum

Instructor: Michelle Walker

Course Description:
Students investigate the societal issues affecting members of the Syracuse community by completing a 35 hour community service requirement, attending 4 class meetings to reflect on their experiences, and completing weekly journals and two paper assignments. This course is available to all students.

 

PAF 200 (1) University Service Practicum

Instructor: David M. Brown, Assistant Director of Residence Life

Course Description:
The Public Affairs Program offers this course in collaboration with the Office of Residence Life to help students develop life habits that will improve their effectiveness as communicators and leaders.

 

PAF 315 (3) Methods of Public-Policy Analysis and Presentation

Instructor: William Coplin

Course Description:
Opportunity to develop competencies in the application of social science methods to public-policy problems. Students perform 50-80 hrs. of work for a community agency. Must have permission of instructor.

 

PAF 410 (3) Practicum in Public Policy: Government and Non-Profit Organizations

Instructor: Frank Lazarski

Course Description:
Tensions and collaborations between/among the public, private, and nonprofit sectors as they identify and address public concerns. Students are placed in community agencies and provide 10 hrs. per week of service. Seminar meets bi-weekly. May be repeated for credit. Must have permisison of instructor.

 

PAF 410 (3) Practicum in Public Policy: Community Benchmarks

Instructor: Carol Dwyer (permission of Dept. Chair required)

Course Description:
Students develop skills and gain knowledge about organizations that influence and implement public policy. Students are placed in community agencies for about 100 hours of work or work in applied research projects conducted by faculty. Prereq: permission of instructor.

 

PAF 470 (1-6) Experience Credit

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Independent study.

 

 

Sociology

SOC 319 (3) Qualitative Methods in Sociology

Instructor: Prof. DeVault

Course Description:
Field research methods including participant observation, unstructured interviewing, life histories, and case studies. Preparation and analysis of field notes and interview data.

 

SOC 399 (3) Upper Division Honors: Senior Research Seminar

Instructor: Prof. DeVault and Prof. Zerai

Course Description:
Senior majors develop topics with seminar leaders’ assistance, and conduct independent research with guidance from the seminar leaders and other faculty mentors. Research papers are presented at our annual Sociology Senior Research Symposium held in the Spring. All senior sociology majors are encouraged to participate. Those with 3.0 GPA and 3.5 Sociology GPA receive graduation with “distinction in sociology.” Sociology majors tell us this is the single best experience they have as a major. For many it has led to employment opportunities and/or decisions on whether to go to graduate school. The seminar this year is co-facilitated by two outstanding faculty. Open only to senior sociology majors. VIP waiver required.

 

SOC 470 (1-6) Experience Credit

Course Description:
Participation in a discipline – or subject related experience. Students must be evaluated by written or oral reports or an examination. Limited to those in good academic standing. Prereq: permission, in advance, of assigned instructor, department chair, or dean.

The Soling Program

The college’s Soling Program is open to all undergraduates at the University. Students may enroll once or repeat the program several times for credit, choosing new projects and learning new skills each semester. It is a rare opportunity if you are attracted to team problem-solving with a hands-on approach. The projects reward initiative and creativity and are graded for full credit. (taken from the 1996-97 Undergraduate Course Catalog)

Many of the Soling Program projects deal with helping non-profit agencies or small businesses. For more information contact Frederick W. Phelps, Director, at (315) 443-3133.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Program: Women’s Studies

WSP 270 (1-6) Experience Credit (Lower Division)

WSP 470 (1-6) Experience Credit (Upper Division)

Instructor (s): Diane Lyden Murphy, Carol R. Awasu, Staff

Course Description:
WSP 270 and WSP 470 are extensively utilized as practice experiences for students who wish to engage in community service with women, or work on projects which are women related. These courses allow Women’s Studies students to engage in feminist praxis both on campus and off campus, strategizing, organizing and participating in events which empower women to change their life circumstances for the better.

 

 

Writing Program

* WRT 105 (3) Writing Studio I

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Develops abilities to use writing for learning, thinking, and critical reading of complex texts. Workshop discussions and practice in basic elements of the writing process.

 

WRT 205 (3) Writing Studio 2

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Introduces basic concepts of rhetoric and communication and applies them to writing and collaboratively revising and editing longer formal texts. Contrastive study of rhetoric across disciplinary and professional communities. Prereq: WRT 105 or 109 or equivalent.

 

* WRT 305 (3) Writing Studio 3: Advanced Studies in Writing

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Develops expertise in the rhetorical and intellectual skills and arts of writing, examining relationships between general principles and knowledge of content or situation. Sections select particular arts, types, or problems of writing. Prereq: WRT 105, 205 or equivalent; junior standing.

 

WRT 405 (3) Writing Studio 4: Professional and Technical Writing

Instructor: Staff

Course Description:
Prepares students for transition to postcollege writing; how rhetoric functions in professional cultures and more broadly within a high-tech “information society”. Students investigate, read, write about, and practice writing for nonacademic settings. Prereq: WRT 105, 205 or equivalent; junior standing.

 

WRT 400 (3) Select Topics Lifewriting in the Community

Instructor: Eileen Schell

Course Description:
Constructing a Life in Contemporary America In Writing 400. We will explore different genres of contemporary American lifewriting: memoir, autobiography, biography, and oral history. The course will be conducted in a seminar format where we read and analyze 20th century American writers and conduct workshops on class members’ writing projects. Course assignments will include: reader responses, short lifewriting pieces, and an extended individual lifewriting project. In addition, we will work with community residents at a public school and in local retirement homes who wish to compose their life stories.

 

* WRT 428 (3) Community Literacy

Instructor: Margaret Himley

Course Description:
This course offers students the opportunity to put knowledge into action by becoming a literacy tutor in a public high school in the city of Syracuse. Students will study composition theory and pedagogy, learn to be a peer tutor, work in a high school English class for 20 hours over the semester, and explore the many practical, theoretical, and political questions this community learning experience may prompt: What does literacy learning look like for teens in urban settings? What strengths do they bring to the writing process? What struggles? Why?. This experience offers SU students a chance to improve their own writing skills and to understand more about themselves and others, about language use and learning, about public education, and about community activism. At the end of the course we will design a collaborative project to bring together what we have struggled with, questioned, learned, and accomplished. Students must have a block of time free each week during the school day to go to the public high school.

 

CAS 300 (2) Focus on Leadership

Instructor: Professor Marvin Druger

Course Description:
Analysis of leadership styles and development of leadership skills. Guest presentations, readings, project development, peer presentations, self-analysis. Open to student leaders who have access to a specific campus constituency. Prereq: permission of instructor.

As part of the course, there will be readings and presentations by leaders in a variety of fields. These presentations will provide insights about leadership development in different career pathways, such as politics, business and industry, etc. Also, each student leader will develop a practical, meaningful project involving his/her constituency, in consultation with a staff mentor. The proposed projects will be discussed and critiqued in class discussions. During the spring semester, the student leader will carry out the project, assess its outcomes, and write a report. The report should discuss results, barriers to change, strategies used, etc. Selected projects will be presented at a symposium for student leaders at the end of the academic year. The student leader will earn two additional credits for completing the project, assessing it and writing the project.

 

* Several sections of WRT 105, 205, 305 and 405, depending on instructor may include a significant Service Learning component. Please check with Writing Program staff regarding other Service Learning opportunities of which there are many.

 

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